Recognising London: Sir Alfred Robbins (1856 – 1931)

Sir Alfred Robbins

Sir Alfred Robbins perceived influence in the governing of freemasonry in the early years of the twentieth century led to him being described as “the prime Minister of English freemasonry”. Born in 1856 in Launceston, Cornwall, he became a well-respected journalist as London Correspondent for the Birmingham Daily Post from 1888. Robbins joined freemasonry in Gallery Lodge No.1928, the lodge for members of the Press Gallery of the House of Commons, that same year, the first of many lodges and chapters he joined as illustrated by the jewels shown here./—/

Robbins tried to bring a motion in Grand Lodge for the creation of a London Grand Lodge in the early 1900s, but was ruled out of order. This prompted a distinguished group of London masons to form a committee to investigate the best form of administration for London Freemasonry. To head off any discontent, the Grand Master, the Duke of Connaught announced the creation of London Rank in December 1907, the first time that London was recognised masonically as an entity. Robbins later served as President of the Board of general Purposes from 1913 until his death in 1931./—/

Sir Alfred Robbins